My everyday life in Turku

You know, sometimes I’m just wondering… Am I doing my Erasmus exchange or am I on holidays? Or maybe 2 in 1? Let’s check on that. My usual day starts around 11 a.m. Rays of sunshine gently wake me up through the window.

View from my window

viewI lazily stretch and decide to get up. Then I prepare a fresh smoothie from bananas and frozen strawberries for breakfast (healthy lifestyle) and come back to my bed to nap just a few minutes more. When I feel ready to face the world I get up for good and prepare to go to university. As Finnish education system is quite different from my back home, I usually have only several hours of regular classes per week. That is pretty comfortable because I can actively spend my time doing sports, going for a walk around the nearest forest, going to sauna.

Take your card, sport suit and join us!

Right after school I am headitrainersng for one of several shopping malls just to have good time with my friends wandering around the shops. Then we go to Kauppatori to buy some fresh vegetables and fruits at reasonable price. When I come back home I take a short rest before going to yoga classes. At the beginning of the semester I bought a sport card from Tuli ry sport’s club that allows me to take part in all activities organized by them. I love it! The price is low and the classes are great and, what is important, they are taught in English if there are any non-Finnish students present. You can relax doing yoga or burn some calories during energetic Zumba classes.

One of my favorite activities here is swimming because the swimming pool is almost private – there are very few people coming so you have the whole space just for you. When I am back from yoga and swimming I take a walk to the nearest forest to enjoy the wild nature in here. I can admire birds singing around me, blooming spring flowers and experience this unique silence that makes you calm and happy.

forest

In the evening I often have a sauna session. There is no better ending of the day than relaxation in pleasantly hot sauna. Soo does it sound like a busy school day? Or more like wonderful day of your holidays? Greetings from Turku!

 

 

 

 

Text and photos: Joanna Dziag

What can astonish you in Turku?

The first thing that hit me when I arrived in Turku was the almost empty city. Seriously. There were no people walking around, no cars in the streets, no traffic jams, no animals. I came here in January during deep winter time and it was probably the reason for that. Anyway I was really surprised because my home city is always much more crowded.

Snow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fortunately the situation changed within the change of season. And it was striking change for the better. And astonishing again because as soon as temperature raised above 5 ̊C first outdoor tables appeared in front of the restaurants and Ice-cream parlours stood on the Kauppatori. I could not believe my eyes! But hey, that was great, you could feel the overall joy from the fact that spring was coming.

Another unique thing that attracted my attention was hmm duck… or pig? Or maybe ‘pigduck’? I have no idea what that interesting construction is but it is one of a kind for sure. Go and have a look at it. Maybe it will change your life, who knows?

posankka

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During my stay in Turku I noticed many interesting trends and one of them is wearing the reflective beads. They are very popular, almost every person has it! And not only people wear them but their puppies too. I heard that especially in winter it is compulsory. They are available in every shop and they can have almost every shape and colour. I love those with The Moomins! They are so Finnish J I think the reflective beads have just become an element of fashion. You can choose your favourite one or even two or seven and just attach them to your coat, scarf or bag and feel fancy. Not only are they additional decoration of your everyday outfit but also make you more visible in the dark. Only positive things! So let’s start wearing them.

heijastin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Text and photos: Joanna Dziag